Shanghai: first two weeks.

It is a big city indeed. You may think that Chinese people are similar to Westerns, but that’s not true. They have a very different culture with different habits. What struck me the most are the rules of the road (cars take always the priority, even if you’re walking on the pedestrian crossing, so you have to be careful constantly) and internet (which is “filtered”, unless you have a VPN). Apart from that it really is an interesting and beautiful city.

thisistheverge
thisistheverge:

These are the apps you want to try on your new iPhone
Where iOS 7 was style, iOS 8 is substance. Last year, our favorite apps got a facelift, but this year, they’re actually becoming a lot more useful. How? iOS 8 offers a whole range of features that let apps extend themselves — into other apps, and even into widgets inside notification center.

iOS 8 allows developers to create some really awesome apps.

thisistheverge:

These are the apps you want to try on your new iPhone
Where iOS 7 was style, iOS 8 is substance. Last year, our favorite apps got a facelift, but this year, they’re actually becoming a lot more useful. How? iOS 8 offers a whole range of features that let apps extend themselves — into other apps, and even into widgets inside notification center.

iOS 8 allows developers to create some really awesome apps.

instagram

instagram:

Introducing Hyperlapse from Instagram

Since launching nearly four years ago, it has always been a priority to bring the Instagram community simple yet powerful tools that let people capture moments and express their creativity. Today, we’re excited to announce Hyperlapse from Instagram, a new app to capture high-quality time lapse videos even while in motion.

Traditionally, time lapse videos depend on holding your phone or camera still while you film. Hyperlapse from Instagram features built-in stabilization technology that lets you create moving, handheld time lapses that result in a cinematic look, quality and feel—a feat that has previously only been possible with expensive equipment.

We designed Hyperlapse to be as simple as possible. You don’t need an account to create a hyperlapse. Instead, you open up straight to the camera. Tap once to begin recording and tap again to stop. Choose a playback speed that you like between 1x-12x and tap the green check mark to save it to your camera roll. You can share your video on Instagram easily from there.

From documenting your whole commute in seconds or the preparation of your dinner from start to finish to capturing an entire sunset as it unfolds, we’re thrilled about the creative possibilities Hyperlapse unlocks. We can’t wait to see what you’ll create.

To learn more about what stabilization looks like in Hyperlapse, check out this video.

To learn more about Hyperlapse from Instagram, check out help.instagram.com.

Hyperlapse from Instagram is available today for iOS devices in Apple’s App Store. It is currently only available for iOS.

thisistheverge
thisistheverge:

How does the iPhone hold up against a serious camera? Everyone knows that the iPhone 5S has a great camera. I say it myself all the time, even as someone who’s spent too many thousands on cameras and lenses over the years. What does that really mean, though? It’s true that the iPhone 5S does take better pictures than just about any other smartphone. But how close am I to throwing away my dedicated photography setup? I decided to put the 5S against a “real” camera — taking near-identical snapshots across a day and night in Harajuku, Tokyo — to see how things shake out in practice.

Very interesting.

thisistheverge:

How does the iPhone hold up against a serious camera?
Everyone knows that the iPhone 5S has a great camera. I say it myself all the time, even as someone who’s spent too many thousands on cameras and lenses over the years. What does that really mean, though? It’s true that the iPhone 5S does take better pictures than just about any other smartphone. But how close am I to throwing away my dedicated photography setup? I decided to put the 5S against a “real” camera — taking near-identical snapshots across a day and night in Harajuku, Tokyo — to see how things shake out in practice.

Very interesting.